Pattern and Decoration Movement of 1970’s

After seeing Teresa Lanceta’s ‘Rosas Blancas’ in the Venice biennale and starting to think about using fabric to convey across a sense of place, I checked out a book in the library called ‘Contemporary textiles’. Within it I came across the pattern and decoration movement of the 1970’s in which artists played with textiles, patterned fabrics and decorative techniques such as collage, embroidery, sewing and weaving in their paintings. Artists were able to play around with decorative possibilities that were once disapproved on in art institutions and academies. The movement unleashed the possibilities for the co-existence of fine art and craft. They explored a variety of materials including fabric, carpet, wallpaper, pattern and ceramics. This wide range in materials used in the pattern and decorative movement is really inspiring to me. I have only just begun to research into this movement but have already come across a plethora of artists who’s work interests me and is inspiring to my own practice. I will definitely be exploring further into this movement as it seems to be directly linked to my own concept behind my work.

Some artists that I have come across:

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Kim MacConnel ‘Sketchbook 1975’
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Valerie Jaudon
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Jo Bruton ‘Unframed’
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Stephanie Burgman
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Richard Smith ‘Three Square 2’

 

Bibliography

https://www.artspace.com/kim_macconnel

http://www.standpointlondon.co.uk/unframed.html

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Jasper Johns

Jasper Johns’ work from various years showed similarities to some techniques and concepts I am using, and want to use in my own practice. What I liked about Johns’ work were the generic forms and use of repetition to create images, on top of drawing attention to things so familiar that they were ‘seen but not looked at, not examined’.

Additionally I like Johns’ choice of encaustic. I’m very similar in the sense that I am impatient with my work and want the paint to dry straight away, that’s why I tend to stay away from oils. Johns’ use of encaustic (hot wax mixed with colour pigments) meant that he could continuously work and at the same time also meant he was able to build a textured surface to his work. Bringing texture into my work is something I want to experiment with.

Jasper Johns’ work with cross hatching interested me the most as it relates to my practice closely. For Johns, it creates a ‘hypnotic search for visual coherence’. For me, the idea of repeat patterns is a way of representing place and landscape. ‘Between the Clock and the Bed’ and ‘Something Resembling Truth’ have made me think about different ways of creating repeat patterns. Although its not, visually these paintings look like the lines have been scratched into the surface. This technique of sgraffito is something that may translate well across into my practice and give my work more depth. Additionally, Johns’ use of bold colours in fairly blocked sections interests me as I want to work with solid areas of colour this year.

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Jasper Johns ‘Between the Clock and the Bed’
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Jasper Johns ‘Something Resembling Truth’

 

See original post:

https://eviebanksart.wordpress.com/2017/10/25/london-trip-2/

Blue and Orange

As a separate side project I have been looking solely at the colours blue and orange. When I visited London for the Jasper Johns exhibition, I also went to the Saatchi and saw the ‘Calder on Paper’ exhibition. Although I liked the artwork I didn’t find it inspiring. Instead, on the title wall for the exhibition, the whole wall was painted a deep blue with bright orange writing on top. I know that the two colours are complimentary but there was something that I especially loved about this combination unlike other complimentary colour sets. Since London I have been keeping a sketchbook of various ways I have worked with blue and orange. The responses I have been doing are fairly quick and aren’t serious at all, but this is what I love about them. I don’t feel any pressure in this sketchbook, I just play around with the colours and don’t care if the outcome is a success and failure. Blue and orange are two colours together I want to carry on working with throughout the year. I’m not sure yet whether I will be able to combine them in with the work I am creating in response to Teresa Lancets’s ‘Rosas Blancas’ but either way I will carry on using them.

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Influential Concepts from the Key Concept Lectures

Participation

In the participation lecture a key idea we discussed that had the most relevance to me was the idea of keeping the line between art and life fluid. I liked this idea of getting the audience involved in the artwork, whether they are aware of it or not, so the work becomes a collective effort. Andy Warhol did something similar to this with his ‘Do It Yourself Flowers’, only partially completing the painting and getting the buyers of the work to finish it off with colour by numbers. I found this idea interesting as the buyer has to physically get involved in order for the painting to be finished. However, I do wonder if anyone actually did complete the colour by numbers or if they thought it was too precious for them to paint on.

Site Situation

What I found most interesting about the site situation lecture was the idea of using psychogeography as a way to explore cities and create a new awareness of a landscape. Andre Stitt’s ‘Big Pinko’ really interested me. It was a house on an estate in Australia that was due to be demolished. State and Schwensen painted the whole house pink as well as a bus stop. I think it almost made architecture that normally would be considered quite plain, stand out and become something beautiful.  Although this house was demolished, the bus stop still remains and has become a checkpoint for the village.

Object

Perception was a crucial part to this key concept. Everyone’s perception is different, therefore we would all see an object differently. If two people painted the same object, you would never get exactly the same result. There is a limit in knowledge, we will never fully understand an object as we will never be able to properly see it for what it is. For example, the human eye is unable to see all colours, ultraviolet is invisible to us. Therefore, reality is always just out of reach. I found this concept of never really knowing reality to be really interesting and there is so much development from it.

Exhibition 

The exhibition key concept was the most influential for me and my practice. It discussed the importance of exhibitions for creating that relationship between artist and audience, and how different ways of displaying work causes different reactions from the audience. I think this is a key concept I need to consider in my practice, how I display my work and what I hope to achieve from doing so. Exhibitions are a form of theatre as they are all about the movement of the people through the space. The engagement of the art with the audience is crucial. We also looked at how exhibitions are temporary. Although this seems to be quite an obvious point, it also shows that there is never a final word as it can always be revised. Therefore the point you are trying to convey through you work is ever-changing depending on the display of the art. For example, Claude Monet’s ‘Water lilies’ were originally sold as three operate paintings, but now the trio are always displayed together. Sometimes along a long straight wall, sometimes bent round to fully encompass the viewer. This has shown me that there doesn’t have to be one single way for me to display my work and it is always changeable. It has made me think about how I want to display my work and how it completely depends on what I am trying to convey in my work.

Blue and Orange Large Response

After producing lots of trial work in my sketchbook, I decided to scale up and produce a bigger response painting using blue and orange. I used one of the painting collages I had done in my sketchbook. I am quite happy with this response as it is solely focused around blue and orange. It is quite simple in design but I think it is effective. Visually it seems I have taken inspiration from Jasper Johns’ line paintings. I stuck in a large section of blue paper as I wanted to create this idea of disturbing the pattern. I don’t know if this was entirely successful however. I think this is a concept I need to play around with more.

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My Walk to Uni

As my chosen topic this year is creating responses to places I have visited, I decided to create some work of my life in Cardiff. This response is of my walk to uni. It takes me half an hour to walk through Cathays and the park and I always see a lot of rubbish. I decided to collect some of the rubbish I saw on the path of my walk and collage them together. I think the items I collected really show uni culture and the unhealthy consumerism of university students. Within my collage I also incorporated fabrics that most reminded me of Cardiff and embroidered on certain areas. The embroidery was about playing with patterns. Overall I am happy with the visual appearance of my response, but feel there is no real strong connection between it and the rest of my work. My idea for further development is to embroider over the whole of the collage so the viewer has to fight to see what is underneath.

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Painting of Venice

After my first small initial responses to Venice, I wanted to scale up and create a bigger piece inspired by it. Whilst in Venice I collected heaps paper and leaflets from all of the exhibitions I visited. Instead of throwing them away after I finished reading them I decided to incorporate them into my response, as they were Venice for me.

The background of my painting is collaged with the leaflets from different pavilions in the biennale. On top I have painted my own repeat pattern inspired by Venice, particularly the window architecture of many of the buildings. I painted two layers of this pattern over the collage in colours I associate with Venice. The yellow of many of the buildings and the green-blue of the canal.

I like the concept I was aiming for as I think it is a fairly personal response as there is nothing there that anyone else would directly associate with Venice. However I am not completely happy with the colours I have chosen. They are colours straight from a paint tube. I think my painting would be more personally elevated if I mixed my own colours inspired by Venice.

This painting is a good start point for the development of my work this year though, it has opened up this idea of repeat patterns and colour, and is free for wider development. My next idea is to take some of the photos I took in Venice and keep layering repeat patterns over the top until the image underneath is nearly completely lost.

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London Trip

Jasper Johns – The Royal Academy of Arts

Jasper Johns’ work from various years showed similarities to some techniques and concepts I am using, and want to use in my own practice. What I liked about Johns’ work were the generic forms and use of repetition to create images, on top of drawing attention to things so familiar that they were ‘seen but not looked at, not examined’.

Additionally I like Johns’ choice of encaustic. I’m very similar in the sense that I am impatient with my work and want the paint to dry straight away, that’s why I tend to stay away from oils. Johns’ use of encaustic (hot wax mixed with colour pigments) meant that he could continuously work and at the same time also meant he was able to build a textured surface to his work. Bringing texture into my work is something I want to experiment with.

Work that interested me:

Jasper Johns’ work with cross hatching interested me the most as it relates to my practice closely. For Johns, it creates a ‘hypnotic search for visual coherence’. For me, the idea of repeat patterns is a way of representing place and culture.

 

Iconoclasts – Saatchi Gallery 

The Iconoclasts exhibition was really inspiration for my subject work as it had a large collection of textiles art.

Josh Faught:

The first work I saw was by artist Josh Faught who combines different materials and scraps and for sale products (i.e. toilet paper) to create these huge collaged tapestries. I really like the collage aspect to his work which has given me the idea to collect scraps of whatever I come across and sew them all together to create my own collages of different places I visit.

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Josh Fought ‘Untitled (1), from BE BOLD For What You Stand For, BE CAREFUL For What You Fall For’

 

Maurizio Anzeri:

Maurizio Anzeri’s consists of sewing into old, found photographs. Anzeri stitches abstract patterns over the top of the photographs in different colours, blurring the boundaries between abstraction and portraiture. The way he stitches creates a three dimensional effect and the person in the original photograph loses their identity behind all the thread. I like the idea of sewing into photographs and it may be something I further look into later in my practice.

 

Calder on Paper:

The Calder on Paper exhibition was also on, although I liked the work I didn’t find it particularly inspiring. However, what I did find inspiring was the wall sign for the exhibition. The wall was painted a deep blue with bright orange writing on top. I loved this colour combination and definitely want to work with it in the future.

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Philip Colbert: New Paintings

Although his work doesn’t really relate to my own work, I really liked the paintings of Philip Colbert. They are quite literally the definition of collage paintings and art heavily influenced by Pop Art. They are really full-on paintings to look at and your eyes are constantly darting around the canvas, identifying different contemporary culture and art history references. I love the clash between the past, mass culture and technologies of now, my favourite being Shakespeare with The Big Issue. Colbert creates new definition on landscape and the modern world. I can’t pinpoint it exactly but the more I look at Colbert’s New Paintings the more I love them.

 

Victoria Villasana:

In the prints and originals gallery there were several pieces of work by Victoria Villasana that caught my eye. They used a similar technique to Maurizio Anzeri of using embroidery stitching across the face. I love the bright colours used and the incorporation of embroidery.

 

Tate Britain:

Whilst in Tate Britain I came across a sculpture by Barbara Hepworth. What attracted me was the use of colour. It used the same blue and orange I had seen in the Saatchi but this time it was applied to the art itself. It is definitely a sculpture I will refer to in my work as I love the colours, shape and use of thread.

 

Bibliography:

https://www.artsy.net/artwork/jasper-johns-target-1

https://theredlist.com/wiki-2-351-861-414-1293-1236-1289-view-neo-dada-profile-johns-jasper-1.html

 

http://www.studiointernational.com/index.php/past-things-and-present-jasper-johns-since-1983

http://arthistorynewsreport.blogspot.co.uk/2016/05/jasper-johns-edvard-munch.html

http://www.artnet.com/artists/jasper-johns/foirades-fizzles-a-LsGlN98DtjtvXWI4G2WryA2

https://www.visitlondon.com/things-to-do/event/45561585-jasper-johns-something-resembling-truth-at-royal-academy-of-arts

Responses to Teresea Lanceta’s ‘Rosas Blancas’

Initial responses to Teresa Lanceta’s ‘Rosas Blancas’

These are some initial responses to ‘Rosas Blancas’ where I have played around with patterns, colour and material. I used the technique from the ideas lab and created quick simple responses directly from the artwork, focusing on specific areas and concepts. My initial responses have worked a lot with square patchwork, similar to ‘Rosas Blancas’ and the layering of different patterns next to each other. Initially I have also chosen to work with a similar colour palette. I have begun trialling with a variety of materials to get a grasp on what materials work well and which don’t work quite as well. The responses including embroidery, I think are the most successful and interesting.

 

Responses to Venice drawing inspiration from the work of Teresa Lanceta

I have started making some simple responses to Venice by taking some of the paper I collected from Venice and laying repeat patterns over the top inspired by Venice. In particular, the window shapes of many Venice buildings.

Swaps: Photographs from the David Hurn Collection

The National Museum of Cardiff was displaying a collection of David Hurn’s photography. Although photography doesn’t directly interest me, several of the photographs seemed relevant to my practice.

 

“The contemplation of things as they are without substitution or imposture without error or confusion is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention.” – Francis Bacon